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SKIPPERS & CREWS

01056V1Skipper of RESOLUTE (1920) and YANKEE (1930 & 1934)

Charles Francis Adams III (August 2, 1866 – June 10, 1954) was the United States Secretary of the Navy under President Herbert Hoover and a well-known yachtsman. Charlie Adams, as he is known among his friends, is the head of the Adams family, one that has been famous in the history of this country.

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CharlieBarrVWho is this genius?

And what his training that so peculiarly fitted him for his high estate? A Scotchman by birth, a sailor by nature, a grocer by early training, and navigator and helmsman of imperishable fame by dint of indomitable will, unequaled skill, infallible judgment, and an irrepressible love of boats and all that pertains to them.

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JohnBarrV2Capt. Barr was born in Glasgow, Scotland, but removed with his parents at an early age to Gourock on the Clyde. Here the famous skipper sailed his first race and began his career as a yachtsman, which resulted in the first 12 years of racing in an average of 10 winnings a year, all in small boats.
Capt. Barr during his career had charge of the Neptune, a Fife boat, in which he won 35 prizes out of 50 starts, all sailed in Scotch and Irish waters.

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03852VDick Brown was a New York and Sandy Hook pilot who sailed the schooner-yacht AMERICA to England in the summer of 1851, and was at her helm when she successfully raced for the trophy that was to become known as the America's Cup.
Pilots from ports like New York and Boston were a special breed. They sailed in small schooners and managed in all weather conditions to shepherd big ships into the harbor.

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01916VWilliam Burton had sailed in more than 1000 boats in British waters. For twenty five years, yachting has been his favorite sport, but instead of making a play of yachting he has made it a study just as much as he has his business. He is one of those men who never stay at anything. Everything that he undertakes he enters into with heart and soul. For that reason he is also master of a pack of hounds and during the season is an ardent huntsman.

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03770VWilliam Butler Duncan Jr., known as Butler Duncan, was born in New York in 1853.
His father, William Butler Duncan was from Scotland, and completed his college education in this country. He became a banker in New York City and then President and Chairman of the Board of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad Company from 1874 until his death in 1912.

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CarterJVBorn in Wivenhoe in 1850, John Carter began sailing at a young age aboard "smacks", the typical fishing boats of Rowhedge and its neighbourhood. At the age of 22, he helmed small yachts and in 1875, he distinguished himself as the skipper of the 10-ton Lancer and later of the 110-ton cutter Moina.
His reputation led to him taking command of the Genesta, the English challenger for the fifth America's Cup. The American yacht Puritan won the first race.

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ComstockAJVAndrew Jackson Comstock was one of several Comstock brothers from New London who were accomplished racing yacht masters.

Comstock was skipper of the racing schooner Columbia, which defended during the 1871 America’s Cup challenge and also skipper of the Magic, the successful defender of the 1870 Cup.

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CaptHHaff.jpgNobody in America's Cup history has sailed in the afterguard of more successful Cup boats than Hank Haff, skipper or tactician of four winners between 1881 and 1895. As of 2004, only Nathanael G. Herreshoff, C. Oliver Iselin, and Dennis Conner have matched his remarkable record.
Before the advent of Captain Charley Barr, his supremacy in America was unquestioned.

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01115VIn the third race of the 1934 challenge RAINBOW was down by two races and behind in the third when C. Sherman Hoyt took the helm. This was the closest that the N.Y.Y.C. would come to losing its treasured cup until 1983.

Hoyt was known for taking the helm in light weather because of his uncanny ability to note slight wind changes, and this time was no exception.

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Arthur Knapp, Jr., the oldest child of Arthur and May (Dalton) Knapp, was born on January 5, 1907, in Bayside, Queens, New York.
He learned to sail with his father and in 1916 was given his first boat, a Butterfly Class catboat named FLUTTERBY. Two years later, the young Knapp moved up to a bigger craft, a 22-foot Star Class keelboat. The Star boat was the beginning of what Mr. Knapp once described as his extended "love affair" with the class.

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Frank John MURDOCH is born February 21, 1904 in Antwerp,Belgium, son of Dan Murdoch and Alice Murdoch (born Jansen), married to Phyllis Murdoch (born Strutt), he had two boys Anthony John and Colin Peter. He died June 13, 1996 in Nyon, Switzerland.
His involvement with boat building was no surprise. The Murdoch family had been engaged in it since 1867, and he had cruised and raced ...

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NicholsGVBetter sailors have raced for the Cup, but no finer or kinder men

George Nichols was a son of Mr.John W. T. Nichols and Mrs Mary Blake Slocum. He is a brother of Miss Susan F. Nichols and of William B. Nichols. He was graduated from Harvard in 1900. He is a member of the same firm as his father, Minot, Hooper & Co. dealers in cotton goods at 12 Thomas Street.

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04378VCaptain Urias Rhodes was born in Bay Shore, Long Island, on February 23, 1852. He was the son of Richard Rhodes, whose father, William Rhodes, lived in Rockaway before coming to Bay Shore. William was four times married and had 13 children. Richard was the only child of the union of William and Elizabeth Brower. Richard was born in Bay Shore on December 8, 1827, and died September 6, 1916. He married Selina L'Hommedieu on January 28, 1851.

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Above all, he was modest.

Roderick Stephens, Jr. (1909-1995) was a renown yachtsman of the twentieth century. Born in New York City in 1909 Stephens began his sailing career off Cape Cod in 1919. In 1928 Roderick Stephens left Cornell University after one year to work up through the ranks at the Henry Nevins boat yard on City Island.

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EdSycamoreVTHE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS, OCT 3, 1901 (races not finished)

Captain Sycamore and Captain Barr are emphatically men of the day and men of the week, though they may have no mention as yet in “Men of the Times.” Their names have gradually displaced, on the popular tongue, the names of Shamrock II and of Columbia, and we have had a duel in New York waters ...

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03423VCaptain Albert Barr Turner was a fishing skipper of Wivenhoe who developed a reputation for winning races. He was a member of the large Barr family through his mother.

He married in 1887 with Caroline Mattock. They had three children : Caroline Maud bn.1888, Hannah bn.1890, and Gertrude bn.1892.

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